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Please ask for permission if you wish to use the images for something.

Check out the zoom-ins and backgrounds to seeself-similarity patterns in the fractals.

To learn more about fractals, you can check out this website.

To learn more about what fractal art is, read the manifesto by Kerry Mitchell.

last modified Wednesday, 18-Jan-2012 16:17:40 MST

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Mandelbrot: Funky Alien.
Title: Funky AlienDate: 7/29/2003

This is the first fractal artwork I made using UF3. It kind of looks like an album cover. I guess it is a sunglasses-wearing extra-terrestrial. The body is a Mandelbrot-form Nova fractal to which the orbit traps outside coloring algorithm has been applied. The afro is a Magnet Mandelbrot. The background, made from Newton fractals, tries to mimic the abstract wavy ribbons that you sometimes see in the backgrounds of funk music videos. An iteration-based orbit traps outside coloring algorithm using wave trap shapes worked well. The jagged edges of the alien's feet could be cleats, or perhaps the worn-out cuffs of bellbottom jeans.

Comments? e-mail me. (Remove the NO_SPAM_ prefix.)

- W.Wu, 7/29/2003 4:55PM

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Julia: Supersession.
Title: Supersession Date: 7/31/2003

My original intention with this piece was to imitate what I think is "traditional-looking" fractal art, by superimposing several differently colored snapshots of a spiral-like fractal. However, I ended up deciding that my first layer looked good enough to stand alone. It's a Julia fractal. I think the bright white spiral contrasts nicely with the dark, stone-like topography that curls around it.

- W.Wu, 7/31/2003 10:36PM

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Mandelbrot: Blue Rose.
Title: Blue Rose Date: 8/3/2003 6:41PM

After playing with a Mandelbrot fractal for a while, I discovered the rough outline of a stem and flower pattern, motivating me to make the above.

Self-similarity patterns: The blue petal head has grooves which whirlpool infinitely into two vertigo-like drains. The leaves also have interesting patterns; check out these zoom-ins to see four-leaf groups growing inside four-leaf groups ad infinitum.

Blue roses do not naturally exist. They can only be bred artifically, by cultivating white rose buds in a blue pigment that eventually permeates the petals. Consequently, perhaps a blue rose is a good symbol for fractal art, which creates nature-like phenomena through creative human intervention.

- W.Wu, 8/3/2003 7:59PM

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all images copyrighted by william wu
page last modified Wednesday, 18-Jan-2012 16:17:40 MST

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